Friday Finds – 22nd February

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Ah, Friday! I’ve had a much better week this week but I’m definitely still ready for my weekend. I hope your week has been good and you have fun plans for the weekend. To start it off, a little light reading…

I was most interested this morning to learn that my chance has finally come to take part in the Olympic Games…sort of. In a bid to make the public more involved in the Paris 2024 games, organisers have announced that they will stage a mass participation marathon, on the actual marathon course, on the same day as the elite events. And while there’s no hope of an Olympic medal, I wonder if there will be some kind of race souvenir for those who take part. It would be pretty cool!

Speaking of elite athletes, last weekend was quite the one for records and record attempts. First, Hayley Carruthers had a go at breaking the recently set parkrun women’s record and although she missed out, I love her determination tion to try again as that means this particular record is shaping up to provide lots of healthy competition this year and keep women’s running firmly on the radar.

And this was followed up with another record-breaking woman (and one of my favourites) Laura Muir smashing the women’s indoor mile record. I’ve written before about how much I love Muir’s attitude and determination, but now I also love how sensible she as she has her sights set on another event and is making sure to protect herself from February germs. I think I could learn a thing or two about that!!

I’ve also made no secret of my admiration for Jasmin Paris and I know I’m not alone in this one, but here’s a piece from a source I never expected to be including in one of my posts… Vogue! That’s right, Paris did an interview for Vogue! Also pretty cool.

And finally, what if the miles you ran added up to free beers? Well that’s exactly what’s happening in a new joint venture between New Balance and Strava. At the moment it’s only in London, but I definitely like the idea of paying for drinks with miles. I’m sure I must have earned a few…!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

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Friday Finds – 18th January

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Happy Friday everyone! Have you had a good week? It’s been pretty busy over here and I’m looking forward to the weekend now. In Friday Finds world I seem to have gone from not much to share over the festive period to having loads pop up this week, so I’ve selected a few interesting things to share. Here we go…

I have to start with the incredible story of the Montane Spine Race and the amazing victory by Jasmin Paris. I’m completely in awe of anyone who took on this brutal 268 mile race, but even more so Paris since she was the outright winner – and first ever female to claim the victory. Not only that, but she only gave birth to her daughter 14 months ago. What a fantastic achievement and proof that we really can do anything we set our minds too.

Another race getting a bit of publicity this week was the London marathon and their announcement that World record holder (and arguably greatest marathoner ever) Eliud Kipchoge will be going head-to-head with European record holder (and home favourite) Sir Mo Farah. After stellar performances from both of these athletes in 2018, this will be an exciting race to watch. Here, Kipchoge is interviewed about the upcoming “battle” with Farah and his comments reveal much about how he thinks tactically and psychologically about races – even if his reference to Farah’s 2:05 in Chicago as “not really fast” reminds us of how relative these terms are! I do love both of these athletes and can’t wait to see what happens in London this April.

While we may not run at the blistering pace of the Kipchoges and Farahs of this world, we can all benefit from taking part in organised events. In a report perhaps a little obvious to those who regularly take part in races, a recent study has found that taking part in an organised race leads us to feel happier and more satisfied with life in the weeks after. I would extrapolate from this information that parkrun would have a similar effect as it also creates the sense of achievement and camaraderie which leads to that wellbeing boost. Time to encourage more of your friends to join you for a run?

Sticking with good news stories, I was pleased to read about the steps taken at the recent Walt Disney World Marathon weekend to reduce waste and promote recycling. I was already aware of races seeking to reduce their use of singe-use plastics such as water bottles and most runners are hopefully conscious of disposing of their gel wrappers responsibly, however I had never really thought about races providing bananas and what would happen to those peels. But banana peels from the Disney races were not only collected, rather than going straight to compost there were measures in place to turn them into electricity or fertiliser. I hope more events, especially major ones, follow suit with recycling receptacles along the race route (I know the Paris marathon does this for plastic bottles) and look for ways to reduce waste.

And finally, perhaps a little more grim as stories go, but I found this one absolutely fascinating. Apparently analysing your Garmin data might tell you a lot more than your miles splits and heat rate…it could link you to a crime! You have to read this one if you haven’t see it already and learn a bit more about how Garmin data helped to convict a hitman. My favourite line has to be “As seriously as Fellows seemed to take his preparation, he did not appear to consider witnesses would notice a cyclist wearing both commando gear and a hi-vis safety vest while toting a gun.” Right. Brings a whole new meaning to “Strava or it didn’t happen!” 😂

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 4th January

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Happy New Year! I hope your 2019 has started well and you aren’t suffering too much from festive excess. My news feeds are still looking a little “light” in terms of interesting articles, but I’ve still got a few things to share with you today.

Let’s start with a longer read. At this time of year we are surrounded by “new year, new me” attitudes and lofty resolutions which people believe will transform them overnight. With so many resolutions relating to exercise, it’s worth remembering that there’s more to leading a long and healthy life than a flurry of activity every January! In this article for The Guardian, Vybarr Cregan-Reid traces some of the history of exercise fads and how changes in lifestyle have led to where we are now. Interesting stuff.

Next, a bit of science. When I saw the word “physics” in the title of this one I was worried that it would be beyond me, but actually it’s pretty fascinating. From applying scientific understanding of how liquids move, scientists have been able to predict the movement of runners towards the start line of a marathon. It’s worth watching the video in this one which shows it speeded up, and I can see how the runners do have a “liquid-like” motion. See what you think.

On the subject of marathons, one of 2018’s most prolific runners had to be Yuki Kawauchi. Already well-known in some circles (especially Marathon Talk listeners!) Yuki shot to fame after his win at the Boston marathon. But that only tells part of the story as competing in multiple marathons and clocking pretty resectable times is pretty standard in the life of Yuki Kawauchi. If you’re not sure what I mean, here’s a breakdown of his year:

Hopefully 2019 will continue to offer incredible marathon moments like we saw in 2018. To that effect, Martin Fritz Huber wrote the following column for Outside with some of his predictions for the year ahead. I wonder what we’ll think of this a year from now…

And finally, if you’re heading to parkrun this weekend then perhaps you have your eye on a new PB (or at least your fastest time of 2019 😉). I can only assume triathlete Alex Yee was looking to end 2018 on a high when he clocked the second-fastest parkrun time EVER last weekend. It’s a phenomenal time and I’m trying very hard not to dwell on the fact that I would only have been a bit over half way round when he finished!! Best get to work on that speed…!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 2nd November

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

How is it November! I actually don’t know where this year is disappearing to and I’m definitely noticing the difference now the clocks have changed. It’s looking chilly this weekend so let’s keep ourselves cosy and settle down to do a little reading.

With the New York marathon coming up this weekend and the autumn (fall) marathon season in full swing, a lot of what I’m seeing in my feeds is marathon related. Did you catch this particular gem from last weekend? Venice does have an association with water, but I can’t imagine participants in the Venice marathon expected to be wading through flood waters in order to complete their race. It makes the puddles I encountered in Aviemore look like a mere splash!

Speaking of New York, I came across this piece in Runner’s World about training for NYC taking over the writer’s summer. I just love the tongue-in-cheek way he suggests it’s all doom and gloom….but then reveals that he loves it! Anyone who has ever trained for a marathon can probably relate.

You may also have seen that a new half marathon world record was set last weekend as the previously unknown Abraham Kiptum lowered the mark set 8 years ago by Zersenay Tadese (one of the runners in last year’s Breaking2 project). But what is more interesting is that this same runner, now the proud owner of a world record, was unable to gain a place in the recent Chicago marathon as his credentials were “not good enough” to earn him a spot. This article sets out a few points I hadn’t thought of before when it comes to elite runners having a breakthrough. I wonder how many more undiscovered stars are out there…

While we’re on the subject of breakthroughs, I was fascinated by this piece from Brad Stulberg in Outside about what it takes to have a breakthrough in running or any other aspect of life. If the breakthrough performance is the result of many small, perhaps unnoticed actions, then I am once more reminded that focusing on the process over the outcome is what will ultimately yield results and that if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it as sometimes it takes time. What are your thoughts?

And finally, there’s nothing quite like crossing the finish line of a marathon and knowing you’ve accomplished something amazing, but in the days afterwards there are a few things that almost every marathoner does. I think I’ve done just about everything on this list bar the day drinking (mainly because I’ve never run a race that started early enough for this to be an option!). Which ones have you done?

Happy reading!
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 26th October

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Happy Friday everyone! I don’t know about you but I’m definitely ready for a weekend – the first week of term is always a shock to the system. So let’s kick things off with a few articles to read.

I’m going to start with a couple of more scientific pieces from Outside. To be honest, I’d never heard of the CMAH gene before, but it seems to be pretty interesting. Not only does an ancient mutation in that gene account for an increased risk of some ailments, more recent studies have revealed that it may also have made humans better distance runners. More interestingly, we don’t actually know if distance running was the reason for the evolution of that gene, or if that is simply a happy by-product. Fascinating!

Secondly, a recent offering from the always-brilliant Alex Hutchinson who has been examining a study into training data which aimed to ascertain which form is best. The headline point is that our own internal systems are just as sensitive as any high-tech gadgetry we choose to use and is another valuable reminder that we should tune into our bodies and learn to listen to the signals they are giving us with regard to effort level rather than always off-loading that job to a gadget.

I also enjoyed this letter to running from High School athlete Kate Cox. I love her reflection on the highs and lows of the sport as well as how it has helped shape her. To be honest, it’s exactly the kind of thing I’d love some of my pupils to write when I ask for some reflective writing!

With Halloween coming up lots of little (and not-so-little) girls and boys are planning their costume. With all the traditional ideas still popular – ghosts, superheroes, princesses, etc – it’s refreshing to see this article about two little girls who have decided to dress as their sporting hero, Shalane Flanagan! I think this is just the most amazing idea and only goes to show what an inspiring role model Shalane is for little girls as she is so visible and demonstrates that anything is possible. Love it!

And finally, did you catch Des Linden’s brilliant tweets about the reality of marathon training? I love how real she is and there are definitely a few things in there we can relate to! Which one is your favourite?

Happy reading,
The Running Princess 

Friday Finds – 19th October

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Happy Friday everyone! I hope you’ve had a great week and are looking forward to an awesome weekend. The second week of my break seems to have whizzed by and I can’t believe it’s Friday again already. Here are a few bits and pieces that have caught my eye as the week has gone on.

Let’s start with good old Mo Farah. Not content with winning the Chicago marathon, he’s now championing the Daily Mile project which was started in Scotland. Now he’s encouraging primary schools across London to take part in a bid to make London a Daily Mile City. Sounds like a great idea to me.

Next, a great article from Brad Stuhlberg at Outside about mindset and how our incessant drive to excel might actually be holding us back. As someone who has embraced process over outcome, this provided some real food for thought and I’d love to know your thinking on it.

Next, something from a rather unusual source. I can only assume this hit my feeds because it references parkrun. Church is not for me (although I respect everyone’s beliefs on this) but some of the points made about the sense of community and ethos are certainly valid. I guess we often joke about worshipping at the alter of the long run, but I’ve never considered the ways in which a parkrun community might mirror the church communities of previous generations.

To follow that, an interesting piece about the recent running boom in China. I had no idea that attitudes to running had previously been so different to here, or how much more expensive race organisation might be. But one of the most fascinating parts of this is the indication that running is part of a bigger cultural change in the country. Running really is powerful!

And finally, if you’re as intrigued as I am by the Nike 4% shoes (although not intrigued enough to meet that hefty price tag!) then you’ll probably enjoy Martin Fritz Huber’s look at how the shoes have been received by various different groups. They’re a bit pricey for me, but I’d still like to try some on…

Happy reading!
The Running Princess 

Friday Finds – 12th October

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Where has the past week gone? Funny how holiday weeks go by so much faster than work weeks!

At this time of year there really is little other than marathons in the news, what with Sir Mo’s awesome win in Chicago at the weekend (did you see it?), excitement building ahead of next month’s New York marathon and, of course, continued discussion of Eliud Kipchoge’s incredible word record, there’s little room for anything else!

Speaking of Kipchoge, let’s start with a couple of articles looking at his record-breaking performance. To start, some consideration of what it could take to break 2 hours. Kipchoge himself came tantalisingly close in the Nike Breaking2 project, and a recent study suggests that a team of runners with similar ability to him could make it happen. Personally I’d love to see someone go below the 2 hour mark, but who knows how long that might take.

On a slightly lighter note, attendees at the Chicago marathon expo had the opportunity to test themselves on an extended treadmill set to Kipchoge’s record breaking pace. Funnily enough, there was a lot of falling!

Related to this, a bit of discussion surrounding pacers in marathons. I’m never sure how I feel about this, I mean the runner still has to actually run the pace, so having the pacers would reduce the mental fatigue of working out what speed to run at as it’s “outsourced” to someone else, leaving them free to “just” run. But for the men, it’s not easy to find someone fast enough to run the desired pace for long enough – especially if Kipchoge is part of the race – whereas there are plenty of speedy male runners who can pace women, and some see this as an advantage, hence changes to the way women’s records are classified. What are your thoughts?

Leaving the marathon aside, the other notable topic this week was World Mental Health Day. Of course I have frequently included links to articles extolling the mental health benefits of running, so it comes as no surprise that Runner’s World (among other sources) published material to coincide with the day. I certainly recognise the boost that comes from a run, particularly when I have gone for a short run before work as my mood is better throughout the day. How about you?

And finally, I don’t know about you but one of my favourite things about running, especially deep in marathon training, is being able to eat lots, but this caused problems for an Ironman triathlete who visited an all-you-can-eat sushi restaurant in Germany. Apparently there is a limit to how much you can have!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess