Friday Finds – 9th June

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Unbelievably, for the third week in a row I’m going to lead with the story of Kilian Jornet and his Everest summits. No, he hasn’t gone and done it again, but he has now returned to “civilisation” and many media outlets have been interested in speaking to him. Here are some the articles I’ve come across, one featuring a short video charting his journey with a voiceover from the man himself:

Next up, one for those of you who are stat geeks like me. It never fails to amuse me how I can totally understand STEM subjects when put in a running context, but have little hope in other situations! In this article we are given some of the key numbers that demonstrate what is driving the running market right now, from participation to brands to record times. Enjoy!

Speaking of science, here’s an informative article from Outside which explains a little more about how exercise benefits our brains. As runners we’re well aware of how much more alert and productive we feel after a run – even the long ones! – and it’s long been recognised that the mind and body grow together. Here’s a bit more of the detail:

A little more science comes to us from Athletes Weekly who this week reported on the findings of a study into why some people can physiologically cope better with the demands of the marathon than others. As an injury-prone runner I found it fascinating to find out that there’s an excellent chance I can blame my parents as it turns out there really are different genetic markers that contribute to how our bodies respond to hard workouts. Having that understanding would really help athletes to better target their strength training to target those specific issues and become more resilient runners.

And finally, you might remember in my Boston special I mentioned that two guide dog puppies were to be named after the race winners. Now, the adorable Edna and Geoffrey are ready to meet their public. Caution: they are way too cute!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 5th May

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

The biggest stories this week seem to be all about records. While one of the biggest news stories is the Breaking2 project, world records hit the news again with the announcement that world and European records set prior to 2005 are likely to be struck from the record books as athlete samples to combat doping have only been stored since that date. This of course means that athletes like Paula Radcliffe, who has always fought for clean competition (and successfully argued to retain her world record after previous attempts to change the criteria) stand to lose their record. I can certainly understand that something needs to be done as there will be many records set by athletes who were doping, however it angers me that clean athletes are set to lose out. Whatever happens, Paula Radcliffe’s 2:15:25 will remain the standard I compare other athletes to as it is a phenomenal feat of endurance that has stood unchallenged for over a decade.

Another controversial announcement surrounded the “exercise pill” which scientists have been studying for a number of years. It is claimed that the pill could provide some of the benefits of exercising, without actually having to work out. This could be of benefit to some groups of people unable to exercise, however it seems to me that it would also be open to abuse as the compound involved was banned by WADA in 2008 and concerns persist around the long-term prognosis of taking it regularly. Fitness benefits aside, exercising is about so much more than just gaining fitness: it’s about fresh air, endorphins and the simple feel-good factor of knowing you worked hard to improve your strength or stamina. No pill can really offer that, can it?

Something that’s really caught my attention is a new feature being rolled out by popular fitness app Strava. Their new Athlete Posts feature will initially be available to a small number of select athletes, but there are plans to roll it out to all users over the summer. Keen to delve even deeper into the social networking aspects of the platform, the new feature will allow users to write longer, blog-like posts to share in the Strava community e.g. tips, kit, training updates, etc. I can already see how this would really easily suck me in to spending more time in the app than I do at present, which may or may not be a good thing, however I will be very interested to see how this new feature develops and how it is used by different groups of people such as elite athletes, everyday runners and bloggers.

Phew! I don’t know about you but after all those serious stories at the start of this post, I’m in need of something a bit lighter, and fortunately I’ve found the very thing. Those of us of a certain “vintage” will well remember the opening credits of TV show Baywatch, with all the slow motion running. Well to celebrate the release of the new Baywatch movie a unique event was organised: the slow-mo marathon. Yup, it’s exactly as it sounds. If you’re in need of a laugh then I definitely recommend watching the video in the article below:

And finally, if even the thought of slow-mo is too much for you, then how about a gym class that’s all about sleeping? That’s right, sleeping. Designed to combat that scourge of modern life, a chronic lack of sleep, classes consist of a 45 minute afternoon nap. Now there’s a fitness trend I could get in to!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Breaking2

Ever since Nike announced that they were going to attempt to break 2 hours in the marathon, I’ve been obsessed with the idea. Can it be done? Can a human being really run as fast as that? Information has been drip-fed to us for weeks now about what is going into this high profile attempt, and it seems the time has finally come. On Saturday 6th May Eliud Kipchoge, Lelisa Desisa and Zersenay Tadese will try to make history at the race track in Monza, Italy.

So what is the formula for success? I thought I’d pull together some of the articles I’ve found on the topic that’s dividing the running world:

Shoes
The athletes will be wearing the new, specially-engineered Nike Zoom Vaporfly which features a carbon-fibre plate designed to increase efficiency. Unsurprisingly the shoe has been the focus of much attention and has caused a great deal of debate.

Fuel
In order to maintain the required pace, the athletes will have to fuel differently so they can consume more carbs than they are accustomed to in order to increase the supply of glycogen to their muscles. This has the potential to lead to GI issues – not what anyone wants when the world is watching!

Pacing
Not just as simple as “run as fast as you can”, the pacing strategy will have to be carefully worked out to give the greatest chance of success. This article makes some predictions about how the event will unfold as well as digging into some of the science behind the pacing.

Preparations
A few weeks ago there was a test run over half marathon distance which allowed everyone involved to see how things had progressed and evaluate whether or not they had to make any changes – a bit like testing out all your marathon kit on one of your long runs! While there were some positives, there were also a number of questions raised.

But Can It Be Done?
That’s the question that is dividing the experts. Some studies have suggested it is possible, but those writing for most media outlets have expressed doubts. Personally I think it’s going to be a really exciting attempt, and you have to admire those involved for having a go. It would be amazing if one of these athletes (experts think Kipchoge the most likely) breaks two hours, and the optimist in me would love to see this happen. The realist in me isn’t sure if we’re quite there yet, but does want to believe it’s possible…one day!

It seems that everything “controllable” has been planned out, so it now comes down to the “uncontrollables” – conditions and the performance of the athletes on the day. Whatever the outcome, the process has certainly got the running world talking and I for one can’t wait to see how it all pans out.

If you want to follow along then Runner’s World has the information here.

What do you think: is a sub-2 marathon possible?
What are your predictions for this attempt?

Friday Finds – 7th April

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

I can’t imagine it will be much of a surprise that I’m going with a marathon-centred Friday Finds this week! Due to travel timings I’m writing this (quickly!) in advance so it may turn out a little shorter than I normally like. C’est la vie!

First up, some breaking news from the elite ranks and the disappointing information that the 2016 Olympic champion (and defending London marathon winner) Jemima Sumgong has failed an out of competition drugs test. I remember watching her stunning comeback to win after suffering a fall and hitting her head during the London marathon, so am saddened to hear that this has happened.

Next up, another piece of disappointing news, this time about participation. I was thrilled to learn that women would be able to compete in the 2017 Tehran marathon for the first time, however the sting is that it has now been announced that female participants may have to compete on an indoor track rather than outdoors with the male field. This seems to be a move forward from a previous announcement that women would not be able to participate at all. It’s clearly a difficult ongoing situation, but I’d love to see women having an equal opportunity to participate.

Moving on to a much more positive story, I have been quite intrigued of late by Nike’s plans to try and break the 2 hour barrier, however in this next piece from Outside, consideration is given to the female equivalent. The record is, of course, held by my great favourite Paula Radcliffe (remember that time I met her?) with her 2003 time of 2:15:25. And now it seems that science and maths (not my strongest subjects outside of running topics!) suggests that the equivalent marker for women is 2:16, meaning that for we women, that “barrier” has already been broken! As they shout along the route in Paris, allez les filles!

While the less elite among us may not have our sights set on quite such speedy times, in all likelihood those of us with a spring marathon ahead will have a time goal in mind, but working out a reasonable estimate of what we might achieve is very difficult. The marathon is full of pitfalls and no matter how well training has gone, anything can happen on race day, especially after 18 miles. Ian Williams of Fetch Everyone has used the data available to him on his website to come up with a formula which might help.

And finally, one of the things we can’t control in a race is the weather. I’m expecting warm conditions on Sunday in Paris, which will be tricky, but I think participants in this recent 14k race in France had a much tougher time with some very different conditions. I recommend watching the video to get the full effect!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 3rd March

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Can you believe it’s March already? The year seems to be slipping by so quickly and it will be marathon day before I know it! Whatever you’re up to just now, here’s a selection of articles that caught my eye recently for a bit of weekend reading…

Speaking of marathon day, I know I have a preference for larger events and scenic routes so the thought of completing a marathon on a track really doesn’t appeal – but that’s exactly how the writer of my first article chose to spend a Sunday recently. To put that in context, 26.2 miles is 105 laps of the track. That would require great mental strength to overcome the tedium of running round and round for hour upon hour. Mind you, at least it would be easy to find your supporters!

But it’s not just running laps of a track that needs mental strength. Whether your goal is parkrun, an ultra marathon, or anything in between, mental resilience is crucial. In this recent article from The Guardian, elite athlete Tina Muir gives her tips to help overcome nerves and and help you to run strongly without being held back by those mental demons.

A different kind of mental battle explored in this next article from Outside online is guilt. As runners we often find ourselves suffering from some kind of guilt: guilt because we didn’t run today or guilt because we skipped something else like time with family in order to run. It’s an interesting article as I can understand where the writer is coming from: there are so many things, including running, that we need to squeeze into our days, and not enough hours to manage them all. Whatever choice we make, there will inevitably be a degree of guilt about something that isn’t getting done. Anyone got a solution?

An interesting way to assuage that guilt might be to combine running with business. With the current growth of running around the world, more and more people are making connections through running which ultimately benefit their working lives. I can certainly see how having running as a common starting point would help to bring like-minded people together, so was intrigued to learn how far this had developed.

And finally, as if running a track race wasn’t tough enough, one runner from Ireland recently found himself hampered by a much more unusual item: a giant rubber band! The video is worth watching for the commentary alone, andis a great reminder that when it comes to running anything can happen!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 10th February

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

After a sleep special and a mindfulness special, this week it’s time for something much more firmly rooted in the act of running. As winter continues to hold us in its icy grip and all those goals set with such optimism just a few short weeks ago seem so far out of reach, I thought I would bring you some finds all about inspiring people who will hopefully lift your spirits and provide some motivation.

First up, the recent news that legendary runner Ron Hill finally ended his running streak…after over 50 years!! I know lots of people commit to running streaks for a variety of reasons, although I must confess it’s never seemed like something I wanted to do as I know that running too much, for me, tends to lead to injury. I’ve known people take on running streaks throughout December and by the end of the month they’re exhausted and looking forward to a day off, so it’s with real amazement that I consider Ron Hill’s achievement. It’s quite incredible to think that for over 50 years he was never once too ill or too injured to manage his run, and that’s a real testament to his commitment. That commitment only ended due to a health issue (and he still made sure to complete – and time! – his last run) so I wish him well in his recovery.

Another runner who has earned a day off is US Olympian Ryan Hall who recently completed the World Marathon Challenge of 7 marathons on 7 continents in 7 days. Yup, you did read that right! This endeavour was Hall’s farewell to running and, in a poignant symbol of closure, he left his marathon shoes on the finish line of his last race. I read several stories about this event over the week it was taking place, but what I really liked was seeing Hall’s Fitbit stats which he published at the end of the challenge and which show a grand total of over 308,000 steps. That definitely blows my 10,000 per day out of the water!

Closer to home, I was thrilled to hear that Scot Callum Hawkins set a new Scottish half marathon record in Japan last weekend. Having recently heard that the record time he thought he had run at the Great Scottish Run in the autumn would be discounted since the course was found to be short, setting a new record was the perfect response and continues to show the strength of elite Scottish athletes right now alongside fellow record-setter Laura Muir and speedster Andy Butchart. I can’t imagine I’ll be troubling their records anywhere other than in my dreams, but it’s inspiring to know that Scotland can produce world class athletes and that as a nation we have a bright running future.

But enough of all these men, now it’s time for some inspiring women. One of my first book reviews on the blog was of Alexandra Heminsley’s Running Like a Girl and I’m excited to read her second book which focuses on her journey as she learned to swim and took on a mammoth challenge. All this set against the backdrop of IVF treatment and heartbreak. In this edited extract, published in The Guardian, Heminsley demonstrates the resilient spirit and mental strength needed not only to face her swimming odyssey, but to take on everything life throws at her. It’s a longer read, but well worth it.

And finally, if body image is something that holds you back, then why not look to Kelly Roberts aka Run Selfie Repeat for the inspiration to embrace a strong body rather than a “perfect” body. Kelly’s blogs are always honest and are never hidden beneath a veneer of “perfection” for a social media world – if she’s having a tough time, if workouts are hard or a race doesn’t go as she would have liked, she shares it. That’s so refreshing and reminds us that (as I often tell my pupils) it’s ok to find things difficult; it’s not ok to not even give it a go. Earlier this week the Run Selfie Repeat Podcast was launched and I’ll be having a listen to get more of that trademark honesty and reality. In this article, she tells us more about the #sportsbrasquad which was such a big hit throughout last summer.

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 6th January

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

And just like that, it’s 2017! Happy New Year! I hope the first week of 2017 has been a good one for you and you’ve made some positive steps towards achieving your goals for the year. To help, this week’s finds are all about motivation and inspiration to help you get there.

First, Ed Whitlock. I know I’ve mentioned him before as he recently added another record to his impressive collection. At 85, Whitlock continues to perform phenomenal athletic feats (and can run a faster marathon than I’ve ever done!) which really challenge our belief that age is a barrier to what we want to do. What I find so interesting in this article from The New York Times is the results of various scientific tests Whitlock underwent a few years ago. His VO2 max, muscle physiology and attitude to life all far surpass those of his contemporaries, and scientists are now reassessing what this means for ageing and performance. For me, Whitlock is a fine example of not letting age stand in the way of achievement and reminds us all that it’s never too late to take on a new challenge.

On a similar theme, did you see the story of Robert Marchand earlier this week? Marchand set a new record for the furthest distance cycled around a velodrome in an hour, and while his distance of 14 miles may not sound all that impressive, that changes dramatically with the added information that Marchand is 105!!! He already held the record for those over 100, and now adds the over 105 to his collection. Like Whitlock, Marchand has a fantastic attitude, saying, “I am not here to be a champion. I am here to prove that at 105 years old you can still ride a bike.” Hear, hear!

Now, if you ever wondered about the New Year’s resolutions of elite athletes, wonder no more as Athletics Weekly has you covered. This piece confirms for me that other than athletic prowess, the elites are no different from the rest of us as the common themes in their resolutions are about making opportunities count, making more time for themselves and working hard to get what they want. Probably very similar to your own goals and resolutions for 2017.

If one of your goals was to get more serious about your running, then Runner’s World has provided some great advice about what you might have to change or prioritise in order to improve your running. Lots of sensible ideas here, with the benefits and potential risks set out clearly. I, for one, know that rest and recovery is something I need to pay more attention to and I will be trying to prioritise rest in the months ahead.

And finally, something heartwarming for you this week. A German film student made a 100 second ad as part of his course and this is the result: an ageing marathoner struggling to come to terms with life in a retirement home fights back against the deterioration in his body (and confines of his home) to run again. It may not be an official advert, but I’m still sure it will bring a smile to your face and perhaps even a tear to your eye. So in the spirit of Ed Whitlock and Robert Marchand, enjoy!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 30th December

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Right now, I seem to be existing in that strange hinterland of the festive season where nobody is quite sure what to do. To be honest, the only reason I know what day it is would be that I’m trying to stick to my usual training schedule, but if you’re unsure then hopefully this post will confirm for you that it is indeed Friday! Not only that, but the last Friday of 2016 and therefore most of my finds this week revolve around reflecting on the year just gone and planning ahead for 2017.

So first, the obligatory retrospective posts…

To start us off, The Guardian has put together a fairly comprehensive roundup of sport in 2016. Reading this through reminds me of how diverse it has been in terms of the amazing highs and terrible lows. At times, some of the controversy near enough overshadowed some of the greatest achievements, and it doesn’t look like issues such as doping are going to go away any time soon. Still, if you’re a sports fan and would like to look back over the biggest stories of the year, then this is the piece for you:

This was followed up today with something for the more adventurous-minded, as Kari Herbert collates some of the most inspiring adventures of the year. I love finding out about such feats and the first sentence of this piece drew me in straight away: “To my mind, a great journey is one that inspires others.”  Perhaps you’ll find some inspiration in here…

Another of my favourite publications putting together a roundup of the year was Outside online. Here, they recap some of the biggest trends in fitness in 2016 and what we’ve learned from them:

And also pulling together some great stories from 2016 was Runner’s World. They’ve opted to remind us of some of the most popular stories of the year, and I’m sure there will be one or two in there that strike a chord. Personally, I remember just about all of them and I know at least a couple have featured in Friday Finds at some point.

I also enjoyed this roundup from The New York Times, with its stark reminders of the costs (financial and otherwise) of being inactive, as well as bringing together some of the year’s research into exercise. Again, some of these might have made their way into Friday Finds over the last few months, while others were definitely under consideration:

But if you could really do with seeing the back of 2016 and are turning your attention instead to your goals for 2017, here are some articles that might help you out…

First, some advice from writer Gretchen Rubin about how to go about successfully making changes in our lives. While I don’t really hold with resolutions, I do think goal-setting is important and sometimes achieving a goal requires some changes to our habits. To address those, we need to understand a bit more about ourselves and why we act in certain ways. I recently listened to a podcast interview with Gretchen Rubin and already have some thoughts on which of her “personality types” I fall into, so perhaps if you’re struggling with something this might help to clarify how to make an effective change.

To tie in with this, some thoughts from BBC Capital about why our resolutions fail and how we can be more realistic in our goals for the year ahead:

And finally, if you’re likely to begin 2017 feeling a little less than your best, here are some thoughts on running with a hangover. Should you sweat it out or stay on the sofa eating crisps and binging on boxsets? Let’s see what the experts think…

Happy reading and Happy New Year!
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 21st October

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

I have to begin today with the amazing Ed Whitlock. I’ve heard one or two interviews with him on podcasts and have always been stunned at how well he has continued to run throughout the decades, setting numerous age group records. The reason I’m including him this week is his latest record for the fastest marathon in the men’s 85-89 age group: an unbelievable 3:56:33! The fact that he still runs so well at age 85 is inspiring enough, but when I consider the fact that he is STILL running a faster marathon than I’ve EVER run at less than half his age, I’m overawed. Now I have even more motivation to go for it and get my own sub-4 hour finish!

If I do want to run well for years to come, then perhaps I need to heed the advice of the veteran runners featured in The Guardian this week. Whenever I have any setbacks in my running, I find myself wondering if it’s all over, so it’s inspiring to read of those who found running even later than I did and are still going strong. I’ve spent some time recently thinking about how to structure my training and mulling over nutrition, so I was particularly interested in those elements of each woman’s story. I’ve been eating a lot of avocado this year, so fingers crossed that’s the secret to longevity!

One of my athletic heroes, and one I’ve mentioned on here a few times, is Jessica Ennis-Hill who this week announced her retirement from athletics. I’m disappointed not to see her compete again, but she did hint at this after the Rio Olympics and has made no secret of her desire to develop her family life. I hope she leaves behind her a legacy of inspiring more young girls to take part in sport as she has been such a positive role model in a world of “instagram perfection” and airbrushed, carefully-curated online lives. Of course the retirement of such a high-profile figure in athletics resulted in many articles devoted to Ennis-Hill, one of the best being one written by her coach Tony Minichiello. Here are some of my favourites:

Speaking of women’s sport, one of the pivotal figures in the women’s marathon movement was, of course, Kathrine Switzer. I never tire of the story of her first Boston marathon and how that helped change attitudes to women in endurance sports. I recently heard her interviewed on a podcast and it was fantastic to hear the story in her one words. I know I’ve shared Switzer stories before, but came across this one earlier this week and decided in a week of sharing inspirational athletes, I would share this one too:

And finally, if you’re in need of some inspiration of a more musical nature, why not check out this workout playlist featured in The Guardian a couple of days ago. Whose playlist? Oh, just Barack Obama’s! I’ve spotted a track on there that’s on my playlist too, so I guess we have something in common 😉

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 26th August

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

With the last firework set off, the venues emptied and the athletes back home, it’s finally time to close the door on the Rio Olympics and turn my attention back to other topics for Friday Finds. Believe it or not, I have stored up one or two other things to share with you lately, so it’s probably going to be a fairly interesting mixture!

Let’s open up with a bit of science. Genetic engineering is a topic that brings with it a host of arguments, and I have to say I’m not yet sure how I feel about it myself. On the one hand, the chance to eradicate disease and suffering is tempting, but on the other hand we must question the ethics of “interfering” with nature. But if we imagined for a moment that we did go down that path, what would humans be able to achieve? What abilities would people have? We’ve already seen amazing feats and world records being set this month, but the author of this first article I’d like to share argues that we’ve barely scratched the surface, and that genetic engineering would result in a whole new level of athletic superstar as we continue to push the limits of human endurance. It may all sound rather futuristic, but perhaps the future is not as far away as we imagine…

Next up, something for those of us who’d love to push ourselves a bit further without any genetic modifications. Studies have shown that our athletic endurance is governed by our perception of effort, meaning it’s our brains that put the brakes on when it believes we’ve done enough rather than our bodies. Scientists have now been studying how we can “trick” our brains and keep going. It’s an intriguing idea and may work for some, but I’m not sure if it would be right for me. I know I’m prone to injury and have to listen carefully to what both my body and my brain are telling me when it comes to training. I think I would have to be very careful about how I incorporated anything like this into my training or racing.

And now something of interest to anyone who regularly suffers from blisters. It’s not something I often have a problem with, although I have found the odd post-marathon blister, but I know many people do tend to get blisters despite changing their socks, trying different shoes and slathering their feet in various lotions and potions. But as it turns out, according to Athletics Weekly, the answer is simple paper tape. Apparently just a thin strip of tape can make the difference between miles of hobbling along with that telltale stinging sensation of a nice, new blister, and finishing in comfort. Perhaps one to try on your next long run…

This next one is really cool. At least, I find it really cool! Using the idea of the heatmap which has become so familiar from apps such as Strava, one group has been working on creating what they call “the ultimate route discovery tool”. Using data from runs in Paris (another reason I like this one!) they broke the runs down into time of day and whether it was the weekend or a weekday. Users can manipulate that data to reveal running routes by distance or time of day, look for a running track or even find new green spaces to visit. I’m always looking for new ideas to vary my routes a bit, so this really appeals to me and I’d love to see other places featured.

And finally, here’s a fun piece from Active.Com showing how running can sneak into our personal lives. To be honest, I was nodding at almost every single one so there’s a good chance you’ll recognise yourself in here somewhere. If you’ve ever gone home early because you had a long run the next day, or received nothing but running-related gifts for Christmas, then this one’s for you…!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess