Friday Finds – 21st April

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

At this time year there are always loads of running-related articles around: from coverage of the Boston and London marathons (as well as the countless other spring marathons taking place around the world) to advice on how to get started/run your first race/get faster that come hand in hand with the improving weather. As a result, there are plenty of articles and stories for me to share with you today, covering a wide range of topics…

I’m going to begin with some positive news surrounding parkrun. If you’ve been reading my blog for a while then you may remember my outrage when Little Stoke parkrun closed after the parish council wanted to charge for the use of the park every week, a move which flew in the face of parkrun’s message of being free forever. But last weekend it emerged that the government is to consult on proposed legislation which would ban councils in England from charging volunteer communities (such as parkrun, a not-for-profit organisation) offering free weekly events in public parks. Parkrun is a fantastic community doing great things to motivate more and more people to exercise regularly, so I for one will be pleased to see such legislation put in place.

For those who enjoy cycling (something I really should do more often as I always love it when I do) then the results of a University of Glasgow study published this week provide some good news. The five year study suggests that those who cycle to work cut their risk of death from causes such as cancer and heart disease by over 40%. Great news for those with an active commute, but as ever the downside to this is that the infrastructure for cyclists in this country needs to be improved in order to tempt more people away from 4 wheels and on to 2!

Also published this week were the results of an interesting study into how “contagious” our exercise habits are. Factoring in our propensity to befriend those who are like us, the study looked instead at a network of worldwide participants and analysed a wealth of data to show that, when it comes to running, friends do influence each other. This seemed particularly pronounced when there was a degree of competitiveness involved, and gender differences were noted too. The article mentions that the researchers now plan to look at how this applies to other forms of exercise, and I think it would be really interesting to compare the results.

Something I’m becoming more interested in is the mental side of training and how a strong mind can help improve performance. Part of my preparation for a race, particularly a marathon, is visualising how I want to finish and using long runs to develop strategies to overcome negative thinking. This next article explains a little more about why building mental strength is important, and how we might begin to do that.

And finally, you may remember back in November I included an article about Harry Potter yoga…well now there’s some video! I think my favourite thing about the whole concept is the “Downward Dumbledore” and now I really want to have a go at this. Any takers?

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 14th April

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

I can hardly believe that this time last week I was in Paris getting ready to run the marathon and now I’m back home trying to type this with my cat draped across my arm! What a difference a week makes! Still, it’s the Easter holiday weekend here in the UK, so whatever you’re doing I hope you have fun. Let’s kick it off with a little bit of light reading…

One of the stories I included last week surrounded the Tehran marathon and the disappointing news that female entrants had been told they would not be allowed to run the marathon course. Instead, they were offered the chance to run on an indoor track. I continued to follow this story while I was away last weekend and was thrilled to see many women stand up to this order either by creating their own route or, in a couple of notable cases, running the official route alongside the men anyway. I do love to hear of people standing up for what they believe in, particularly when it comes to equal opportunities for all.

There have been many studies in recent years looking at the connection between exercise and life expectancy. This week, details of a new study emerged which suggested running to be much more powerful than other forms of activity at increasing life expectancy, with an average of 3 years added to a runner’s life. Apparently 1 hour of running can add 7 hours to someone’s life (and not because that run feels like it takes 7 hours lol!). That seems as good as reason as any to lace up and get out there!

For those of us who like to race, water stations can present a bit of a difficulty. Cups can be awkward to drink from on the move (I usually manage to choke!) and while bottles are much easier, they’re not the most environmentally friendly. Step forward the new edible bottle you may have seen shared on social media this week. I watched a video on this product that showed people simply popping this edible bubble of fluid in their mouths, and the creators believe it could be used successfully at races. The article here suggests it will be piloted at the London marathon, so if anyone is running it I’d love to know if they get a chance to try this out.

In a week when science delivered the news of the increased life expectancy in runners and the edible water bubble, perhaps one of its best achievements was in working out just why shoelaces come undone. We’ve all been there, tied them nice and tight then looked down mid-run to see a lace flapping about with every stride. It all comes down to inertial forces it seems, and while some knots might be better than others, sadly no definitive solution has been suggested. Science, get on that one next!

And finally, we’ve all seen those pictures of Strava art and marvelled at the time and planning involved in creating a simple outline or forming a few words, but this week two runners from Cardiff definitely won the prize for the best Strava art ever…a Welsh dragon! The advance planning and 8 hours of running involved certainly reveal their dedication and I’d love to see if runners from the rest of the home nations have a go at something similar. Any takers…?

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 7th April

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

I can’t imagine it will be much of a surprise that I’m going with a marathon-centred Friday Finds this week! Due to travel timings I’m writing this (quickly!) in advance so it may turn out a little shorter than I normally like. C’est la vie!

First up, some breaking news from the elite ranks and the disappointing information that the 2016 Olympic champion (and defending London marathon winner) Jemima Sumgong has failed an out of competition drugs test. I remember watching her stunning comeback to win after suffering a fall and hitting her head during the London marathon, so am saddened to hear that this has happened.

Next up, another piece of disappointing news, this time about participation. I was thrilled to learn that women would be able to compete in the 2017 Tehran marathon for the first time, however the sting is that it has now been announced that female participants may have to compete on an indoor track rather than outdoors with the male field. This seems to be a move forward from a previous announcement that women would not be able to participate at all. It’s clearly a difficult ongoing situation, but I’d love to see women having an equal opportunity to participate.

Moving on to a much more positive story, I have been quite intrigued of late by Nike’s plans to try and break the 2 hour barrier, however in this next piece from Outside, consideration is given to the female equivalent. The record is, of course, held by my great favourite Paula Radcliffe (remember that time I met her?) with her 2003 time of 2:15:25. And now it seems that science and maths (not my strongest subjects outside of running topics!) suggests that the equivalent marker for women is 2:16, meaning that for we women, that “barrier” has already been broken! As they shout along the route in Paris, allez les filles!

While the less elite among us may not have our sights set on quite such speedy times, in all likelihood those of us with a spring marathon ahead will have a time goal in mind, but working out a reasonable estimate of what we might achieve is very difficult. The marathon is full of pitfalls and no matter how well training has gone, anything can happen on race day, especially after 18 miles. Ian Williams of Fetch Everyone has used the data available to him on his website to come up with a formula which might help.

And finally, one of the things we can’t control in a race is the weather. I’m expecting warm conditions on Sunday in Paris, which will be tricky, but I think participants in this recent 14k race in France had a much tougher time with some very different conditions. I recommend watching the video to get the full effect!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 31st March

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

It’s finally the end of term and I feel somewhere between elated and exhausted! The last few weeks have been tough and I’m definitely in need of a break, so tonight I thought I would bring you a more lighthearted selection of finds, focusing on some of the more unusual, entertaining and just plain mad aspects of running…

First up, a new variation on a previous trend. You might already be familiar with the #race the tube phenomenon which went viral in 2014 as a runner tried to beat an underground train between two stations in London. In this latest version, a German marathon runner took on the challenge of racing a subway train for 10k across Berlin. There’s some video included in the article – I hope your German is up to scratch!

Sticking with 10k for now, here’s a story from a most unexpected source for a running blog – Horse & Hound! Including this makes me feel a little like Hugh Grant’s character in Notting Hill when he interviews Julia Roberts about her new film and says he’s from Horse & Hound magazine haha! Anyway, I’ve had my fair share of interesting encounters in races, like seeing those guys who run the London marathon every year dressed as rhinos, or that time I got chased by cows during a hill race, or last Sunday when I had a rather low fly-by from the scary bird of prey that sometimes attacks runners near here… but I’ve never found myself running alongside an actual horse! Yet that’s exactly what happened to runners in a 10k race in Trafford recently when the wonderfully named Mildred escaped from her field and joined in with the race for a couple of kilometres until she was caught! Now that’s not something you see every day!

Another unlikely source for this blog is Classic FM, and yet somehow I’ve come across a story combining both running and classical music as a student at the Birmingham Conservatoire plans to run the Liverpool half marathon this weekend dressed as a viola in an attempt to set a new world record. The current record stands at 1:26:57 so he’ll need to be fairly nippy to beat it. As a fellow string player, I wish him all the best.

Speaking of half marathon records, former professional runner Chris Estwanik set a new record at the recent New York City half for the fastest half marathon whilst wearing a suit. Why? Well, because it was a bet, of course! The Bermuda-based runner was offered a free round of a rum cocktail if he could break the record, and his time of 1:11:36 took more than SEVEN MINUTES off the previous record, so I think someone must owe him a drink!

And finally, if you fancy trying something a bit more unusual yourself, then take a look at this list compiled by The Guardian. It makes me wonder how many more totally bonkers races there are in the world (and how they came about in the first place!). If you’ve tried anything a bit different then I’d love to hear about it…

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 24th March

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

It was a grim start to the week for amateur sports as a BBC State of Sport investigation revealed the extent to which doping is spreading through sport at all levels. Of greatest concern is the statistic that among those polled, over a third personally knew someone who had doped. Looking around the start line at a race, whether or not a fellow runner has taken performance enhancing drugs is the last thing on my mind, but this poll suggests that the issue is more widespread than I would ever have imagined. Perhaps that’s just me being naïve? I’d love to know your thoughts on this.

And there was further worrying news yesterday with the announcement that JogScotland is to suffer a funding cut of £100,000 which will put its future at risk. While I’ve never attended a JogScotland training session, I know of a number of people who have found it invaluable in getting them running, keeping them running and introducing them to like-minded people. I’ve had a couple of positive experiences taking part in JogScotland events, and when it comes to helping those who for whatever reason don’t wish to join a running club, JogScotland is seen as welcoming and inclusive. In an age when inactivity is a ticking time-bomb for health, do we really want to lose a programme that has gained 40,000 members since 2002? I really hope something can be done to save this important resource.

Let’s look to something a bit more positive now. Earlier in the week I came across this article from The Huffington Post. It was published a while ago now, but the content remains relevant as it examines the vocabulary we use to describe our lives, and the messages these words send to children. I may not be a parent, but I do work with young people and considering the connotations of words is part and parcel of my job. Although written ostensibly for parents, the messages within each of these words is relevant for everyone, regardless of age:

I also enjoyed this piece from Outside in which the writer describes his challenge of running a sub-5 minute mile. Far from being an elite athlete, his times in other races are not hugely different to some of my PBs, so this endeavour was more about setting a huge goal and striving to achieve it – something I very much approve of! The headline kind of gives away the result, but I still enjoyed finding out a bit more about how the writer trained and how he felt on the track during his attempt. Running a single, timed mile is something I’ve never tried, but the idea intrigues me and I often wonder what time I would be capable of. Perhaps one day I’ll find out…

And finally, if you thought the track marathon I included earlier this month sounded a bit tedious, then today I have something that’s potentially even more dull: a marathon in a multi-storey car park. No, your eyes aren’t deceiving you. That’s a marathon in a multi-storey car park! 71 times up and down all the ramps, staring at concrete, graffiti and rather questionable puddles. Personally, I think I’d prefer the track marathon – at least there would be a bit more daylight and fresh air!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 17th March

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

There was sad news earlier this week with the announcement that legendary runner Ed Whitlock had died. I included Ed Whitlock in a Friday Finds post earlier this year as well as last autumn when he set a phenomenal record for his age with his sub-4 hour marathon time. Since the announcement of his death from prostate cancer, my news feeds have been filling up with tributes to him, and I wanted to include some of them in my post this week. Goodbye Mr Whitlock. You were a truly amazing example of not letting age be a barrier to achievement.

So what does it take to have the sporting longevity of someone like Ed Whitlock? According to Brad Stulberg, writing for Outside, it’s all in the attitude, and what’s interesting is that the attitude we adopt later in life is largely developed when we’re young. Those more able to embrace sport for the love of participation rather than agonising over results cope much better with seeing performance change with age. My favourite part of this article is the reminder that sport is, “every bit as much about personal growth, community, and having fun. Aging may slow you down but it need not take your identity as an athlete.” Wise words indeed.

Of course we can all expect to see changes is our performance as we get older – after all, no magical fountain of youth has yet been found to stop our bodies ageing – but what exactly can we expect to observe and what does that mean for the way we train? Studies show that we will use oxygen differently, our muscle function will decline and we will need longer to recover from hard workouts. But that doesn’t mean it’s all doom and gloom. With sensible adjustments to training we can continue to participate for many years, perhaps even remain competitive, we just need to make sure we hold on to the motivation to do so! Personally, my hopes are high: my dad still runs and can still beat me over 5k (but I’ll beat him one day…!)

Some good news for our running performance as we age comes from a new study which suggests that while elite athletes tend to peak between the ages of 25-34, those of us who are a bit less elite may continue improving until around 50. Yes, we will be subject to the same bodily changes that come with age, but since we won’t have trained to the same intensity as elite runners, we still might have something left in the tank to perform well for longer than was previously thought likely. The point about adapting training still holds true, but there is certainly no excuse to be using age as an excuse. And that’s something Ed Whitlock would definitely have approved of!

And finally, if that isn’t enough inspiration to set a positive attitude, embrace the joy of participation and set the foundations for a long and healthy life of sport, then here are some other remarkable athletes showing us that age is no barrier to taking on challenges and pushing limits. Maybe one day we will be just like them.

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 10th March

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

With Wednesday being International Women’s Day, I’m feeling inspired to make this week’s Friday Finds all about women, whether that’s articles about inspirational women or the challenges women still face when it comes to sport. Funnily enough, I’ve found plenty!

Let’s start with this article written by Kelly Roberts (of the popular blog Run Selfie Repeat) for Outside online. In it, she addresses the pernicious idea, popularised across social media, that women have to look slim and toned in order to be considered strong and to feel confident. Last summer Roberts overcame her own insecurities about running in just a sports bra and encouraged other women to join her in embracing their bodies and being proud of what they could achieve rather than how they look, hence the #sportsbrasquad was born. The clear message (also shared by Anna Kessel in her scathing piece for The Guardian a few months ago on #fitspo)  is that strong isn’t about looking a certain way, but about feeling a certain way, and that’s a powerful message to share.

As if that wasn’t bad enough, even more horrifying is the fact that so many women are harassed, heckled or made to feel intimidated whilst out for a run. There has been much in the media in recent times about this issue, and though I’m fortunate enough not to have really encountered this problem, I know it is a very real issue in some places. And while offering safety advice to women is all very well-meant, the fact is it just shouldn’t be necessary for a woman to alter her behaviour just because of her gender – the root of the problem has to be addressed. One of the best reports I’ve read on this came in a recent issue of Runner’s World and that, along with a similar piece from The Guardian, is below:

Another issue has been in the coverage of women’s sports and female representation on the boards of various sports. To coincide with International Women’s Day, the charity Women in Sport released a damning report highlighting the number of governing bodies in sport which are not currently meeting government criteria about the number of females on their boards. This has led to suggestions of sexism which, whatever the position, will need to be addressed in order to move forward. Interestingly, when it comes to coverage of women’s sport, the (female) head of sport at the BBC sees things a little differently and believes that positive change is underway. I really hope that is the case, as girls and young women need to see more positive female role models and increased coverage of women’s sports provides just that.

Fortunately, there are plenty of inspirational women out there showing the world what can be achieved. This year marks 50 years since Kathrine Switzer first ran the Boston Marathon and became a catalyst for change in women’s running. To mark the occasion, Switzer will run the Boston marathon again. Also running will be another runner who has made history – Rahaf Khatib – who first came to the world’s attention when she became the first hijab-wearing runner to feature on the cover of a US health & fitness magazine. She will be running as part of an all-female team selected because they continue to push boundaries and inspire others. Fantastic!

And finally, I want to finish on a more inspirational note with some links to videos which (I hope) will lift your spirits. The first, following on from the last find, is an advert from Nike which features Muslim women exercising in a hijab. It has courted some controversy, but sends a powerful message about defying societal norms. The second is a short film from ESPN Women which encourages women to move, meet their potential and challenge those who say they can’t do something. I, for one, love it. The last, released on Wednesday for International Women’s Day, features Serena Williams reciting Rudyard Kipling’s poem If – but as an ode to women. Powerful stuff.

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 3rd March

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Can you believe it’s March already? The year seems to be slipping by so quickly and it will be marathon day before I know it! Whatever you’re up to just now, here’s a selection of articles that caught my eye recently for a bit of weekend reading…

Speaking of marathon day, I know I have a preference for larger events and scenic routes so the thought of completing a marathon on a track really doesn’t appeal – but that’s exactly how the writer of my first article chose to spend a Sunday recently. To put that in context, 26.2 miles is 105 laps of the track. That would require great mental strength to overcome the tedium of running round and round for hour upon hour. Mind you, at least it would be easy to find your supporters!

But it’s not just running laps of a track that needs mental strength. Whether your goal is parkrun, an ultra marathon, or anything in between, mental resilience is crucial. In this recent article from The Guardian, elite athlete Tina Muir gives her tips to help overcome nerves and and help you to run strongly without being held back by those mental demons.

A different kind of mental battle explored in this next article from Outside online is guilt. As runners we often find ourselves suffering from some kind of guilt: guilt because we didn’t run today or guilt because we skipped something else like time with family in order to run. It’s an interesting article as I can understand where the writer is coming from: there are so many things, including running, that we need to squeeze into our days, and not enough hours to manage them all. Whatever choice we make, there will inevitably be a degree of guilt about something that isn’t getting done. Anyone got a solution?

An interesting way to assuage that guilt might be to combine running with business. With the current growth of running around the world, more and more people are making connections through running which ultimately benefit their working lives. I can certainly see how having running as a common starting point would help to bring like-minded people together, so was intrigued to learn how far this had developed.

And finally, as if running a track race wasn’t tough enough, one runner from Ireland recently found himself hampered by a much more unusual item: a giant rubber band! The video is worth watching for the commentary alone, andis a great reminder that when it comes to running anything can happen!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 24th February

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

For those of us who write the date in day/month/year format then this Sunday, 26th February, is a special day for runners…it’s Marathon Day! And what better way to mark the occasion than a Friday Finds Marathon Special…

Arguably one of the biggest stories in marathon running right now is Nike’s Breaking2 project, the sportswear giant’s attempt to have an athlete run a marathon in under 2 hours. There has been a lot of speculation since the company announced their lofty goal back in December, and now some further details of how it will be approached are coming to light, along with some training details and the thoughts of one of the athletes taking part. I also really liked the digital presentation from Runner’s World about what will take to reach this goal

At the other end of the scale, plenty of everyday people are currently doing all they can to train for a spring marathon. Perhaps they are experienced marathoners with a time goal in mind; perhaps they are first-timers, experiencing all the highs and lows of training for those magical 26.2 miles. The marathon is a fantastic distance, but there’s an awful lot you can really only learn about running a marathon by running a marathon. There are countless articles out there offering all sorts of advice about how to prepare for race day, and one oft-debated topic is how long the long run should be. I always say that the best training plan is one that is written for you, rather than some kind of generic template that just doesn’t work – everyone is different and while the traditional 20-22 miles long run may suit some, 16-18 miles may be better for others. For the last few training cycles my longest planned run has been 18 miles, and regular readers will know that I have completed marathons on less! So it was with some interest that I read a little more about the Hansons Method, renowned for its model of running more often, but with lower mileage. I’m intrigued by different training approaches and love learning more about the various ways people prepare, even if the methods aren’t necessarily ones I intend to try for myself.

Those of us who have already run a marathon know that it takes more than just physical fitness but mental toughness as well. Everyone will have a low point at some stage during the race, so how we cope mentally is really important. But can the lessons we learn from running 26.2 miles be taught to others? That’s what the writer of this next article suggests. Running marathons has certainly taught me a lot about resilience, setting interim goals and accepting that not everything will be smooth-sailing – all valuable lessons for any other walk of life and worthwhile passing on to others.

Sadly, there are those who don’t respect the race or other competitors and cheat: perhaps for a better time or to gain the qualifying standard for a race like Boston. But more and more these cheats are being found out, and much of it comes down to business analyst (and former marathon runner) Derek Murphy, who uses race data, finish line photos and an assortment of other tools to highlight those he thinks didn’t play fair. I’ve come across a bit of information about this before so was interested to find out a bit more about the marathon investigator and some of the people he’s caught out.

And finally, pre-race anxiety is common before a marathon with frequent fears being getting lost or coming last. But what if EVERYONE got lost and only the last finisher completed the correct route? That’s exactly what happened at a children’s race in Japan recently. I know this one isn’t really a marathon story, but I just love the fact that the finisher in last place was ultimately declared the winner! It just goes to show that you should never give up, even if your worst fears come true!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

 

Friday Finds – 17th February

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

I’m enjoying a couple of days off work for our half term break and have been able to sleep a little longer and take some time to sort out all the pesky little details of life that can get overlooked during a busy term. So in the spirit of tidying things up, here’s a bit of a random selection of articles I’ve had stored up ready to share but not yet found the opportunity to…

First up, something for those who like to use races as a reason to travel – and who wouldn’t want to run a race steeped in such history as one taking place in Athens? Looking out at a slightly grey evening, some sunshine certainly sounds tempting right now, but instead I shall have to live vicariously through Adharanand Finn’s account of the Athens 10k which appeared in The Guardian this week.

Next up, a slightly tongue-in-cheek account of one man’s relationship with running. I love running, but there are definitely times when love is not what I’m feeling – usually when its’s freezing cold, pouring with rain, my fingers are freezing in my sodden gloves and I still have several miles to go! If you’re anything like me, you’ll probably find some comments in there which resonate with your own feelings about running. But be warned, there are a couple of F-words in there!

After several cycles of marathon training (not all as successful as I would have liked!) I feel like I’ve learned a lot about the process and have made a number of changes to how I train to see if I can get it “right”. I’m certainly not an expert on training, but I am the world’s foremost expert on me and one of the most important lessons I’ve learned is that what works for others won’t necessarily yield the same results for me. That’s why I now run less (and make sure each run has a clear purpose when I do) and incorporate a range of activities into my training in the hopes of avoiding disaster injury. And it seems it’s not just me. Reflecting on my own experiences meant that this next article really spoke to me as the writer sets out the lessons she has learned and how that now impacts on her training choices.

Something else that spoke to me was the opening paragraphs of this next article from The Guardian. The writer’s description of what he found out as he progressed along his running journey is certainly true, but it’s what he writes about music that really jumped out. It was the power of music that led me to start my Tunes on Tuesday series and there have now been a number of times that hearing a certain song has jolted me quite powerfully into a running-related memory. The article includes comment from three different people from differing walks of life, but it was the first one that seemed most on my wavelength. Perhaps one will resonate with you…

And finally, as the miles creep up in my marathon training I find I’m more and more likely to be met with incredulity from non-runners when my response to their perfectly innocent question about whether or not I “still run much” is something involving a number bigger than 10. I do get it; I understand that running isn’t for everyone and people can think of plenty of things they would rather do than run 26.2 miles (never forget the .2!!) for fun. But it was with some incredulity of my own that I learned some of the things that came up in a lighthearted US survey about what people would prefer to do rather than run a marathon. It makes for some rather interesting reading!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess