Friday Finds – 13th October

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Bonjour! I’m back from my trip to France and a little incredulous that it’s Friday again. Last Friday actually feels like weeks ago, and even the first days of the trip seem like they were much longer ago than they really were! Despite being away, I still have several finds to share with you tonight.

First, a story that struck a chord with me as it reminded me of some of my own experiences in marathon running. Dan Kapinus was keen to break 4 hours in the Chicago marathon and used his own data to help refine his training. What he hadn’t banked on was the hot conditions on race day, and no amount of technology could solve that for him. Having now made sub-4 hours my own goal (and suffered in the heat at this year’s Paris marathon) I can completely understand where he’s coming from.

One of the next big events on the marathon calendar is, of course, New York. This year the New York Road Runners have a new campaign featuring the slogan It Will Move You to promote the event. It’s designed to capture the emotions around the marathon experience, and I have to say that having watched the 30 second video in this article, I think it’s done that very successfully – I may not have run New York, but I’ve enough marathon experience to feel that familiar stirring of emotions as I watch the clip. Definitely a race I’d love to do one day…

This next piece fascinates me. I’ve always been fairly certain that I must look awful when I finish a marathon – tired, emotional, and aged. Looking at the before and after shots of runners at a 125k race, I can see that’s very much true. Everyone looks tired and their faces are more drawn, but the emotions of completing the challenge, of conquering physical limits, is written all over their faces. These pictures really do tell a story of everything that has happened in between and I love them!

Another video, this time from a most unlikely source for a running blog – US gameshow Jeopardy. In a recent edition marathon legend Ed Whitlock, who sadly died earlier this year at the age of 86, was featured in one of the “prompts” (for those unfamiliar, the “answer” is given first and contestants respond in the form of a question). Fortunately, the contestant knew the correct response!

And finally, we runners certainly do enjoy a challenge, but I for one have no plans to give this latest craze a go. American runners have started the “porta potty” challenge, which involves fitting as many people as possible into a portable toilet and filming the exit sequence. Apparently, upwards of 30 people can fit in there. I’m trying REALLY hard not to think about how they’re managing that as spending time in a portable toilet is not one of the most appealing parts of race day. I hope they’re trying this out before the toilets see too much use!!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

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Friday Finds – 6th October

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Happy Friday! It’s the end of term and I’m packing for my school trip to France, but never fear as I managed to put this week’s post together in advance!

This week is a big one in the calendar of runners here in the UK as the results of the London marathon ballot come out. For the majority, it was a rejection as the numbers entering the ballot far outweigh the number of available places, but given this one event has dominated my news feeds and social media this week, I’m going to begin with a potentially controversial article. I’m not sure if the writer is entirely serious in the ideas he puts forward, however the comments below it certainly made my blood boil. I’d love to know what you think:

Ok, so we might not all be troubling the top marathon runners any time soon, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t take on a marathon (or marathons) if they make us happy. And what isn’t to love about the Marathon du Medoc – “for drinkers with a running problem”. I always think this sounds like a great event, so enjoyed reading this account of it in Runner’s World.

And speaking of the top marathon runners, have you ever wondered what it would be like to follow their training regime? Matt Fitzgerald decided to find out and became an honorary member of an elite team. Despite sustaining an injury, he is now tapering for the Chicago marathon this weekend and it will be interesting to see how he gets on. In the meantime, this piece is provides some reflection on the process.

Next up, an intriguing suggestion around age groups. While this is a US article and age groups vary a little here in the UK, the origin of this setup is something I’ve never considered, nor is the question at the centre of the article about what would happen if we could choose our age group based on how we felt. In reality I suspect that would cause chaos, but there are certainly days when we feel more energetic than others (and days when we feel like an 80 year old with a walking stick could go faster lol!).

And finally, dogs aren’t usually allowed on the Chicago marathon course, but an exception is being made for Gordon, a paralysed miniature Doberman who will complete the course this Sunday in his owner’s backpack! It’s all part of their fundraising for a an animal charity. I hope they both do really well.

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

 

Friday Finds – 29th September

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Happy Friday! I don’t know about you, but I’ve found this an incredibly long week – couldn’t possibly be anything do to with running a marathon last weekend though ūüėČ

While I was running my marathon on Sunday (full race report to follow) the eyes of the marathon running world were firmly fixed on Berlin, where Eliud Kipchoge was hoping to lower the mark in the men’s marathon. This result of this race was actually one of the things I checked when I was sitting down to eat after my race, and I’ll admit to a little disappointment that Kipchoge didn’t quite make it. Still, his efforts gave rise to a number of follow-up pieces from respected writers in the field looking at his training (just in case you fancy following his training programme!) and the factors which may have prevented him setting a new record. I can’t imagine the fact that I missed my goal too will cheer him up, although it’s definitely comforting to know that even the best runners don’t always achieve the times they want!

Although written before the race in Berlin, this next article is an interesting reminder of the difference between physical and mental barriers. It sets out the theory that mental barriers are much bigger than physical ones, that the belief something is possible makes it much more likely to happen. This is something I can definitely get behind: the mind is very powerful and belief can have a massive impact on achievement.

Anyone who has run a marathon knows that they are tough, however there are many runners who enjoy even longer, tougher (sometimes multi-day) races. And as with anything “out of the ordinary” to the typical non-runner, the big question is usually, why? A question academics at the University of Cardiff have attempted to answer. Interestingly, their findings suggest that the pain experienced may actually be one of the draws, along with a degree of escapism and simply having a story to tell. I may not have any desire to run an ultra, but I do understand that sort of thinking.

In other news, the “mad pooper” story I included last week continues to make the headlines. In a couple of now deleted videos, a spokesperson for the runner in question made reference to some mental health issues as a result of a brain injury, further complicating matters. It looks like this particular story is not over yet, and it doesn’t seem like we’re going to get to the truth of it any time soon.

And finally, do you ever watch a film and laugh at the unrealistic nature of any scenes involving running? Well it seems you’re not alone as Hannah Hartzell, writing for Women’s Running, is clearly fed up of the way Hollywood portrays our favourite sport. Have you got any other examples to add to her list?

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 22nd September

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

In a bid to make my preparations for marathon weekend a bit easier, I’ve written the bulk of this in advance so let’s hope there’s not some huge story that breaks when it’s too late to add it in! Theoretically, as you read this I’m getting myself organised for the trip to Inverness and/or making sure I relax ahead of the race, but there’s no way I wanted to miss sharing some finds with you.

Last week I included the bizarre story of all the runners accused of cheating at the Mexico City marathon. This week, even more has come to light around this with several sources carrying the story. I originally picked it up from Marathon Investigation, where analyst Derek Murphy now believes that the cheating was motivated by a desire for the medal rather than a BQ. Now I’ve coveted some bling in my time, but I’m not sure I could live with myself knowing I hadn’t earned it legitimately.

And the story prompted SBNation to remind us of some other tales of cheating from throughout running history:

Another race hit the headlines this past week, but for very different reasons. Perhaps you saw footage from the Copenhagen half marathon at the weekend, but if not you need to take a look at this. The race began in beautiful weather, but soon changed as storms swept in. Amid lightning and torrential rain, the race had to be stopped to help ensure safety (there were reports of people being struck by lightning) and even the timing mats were floating away. Yet some dogged souls still continued their race. What would you do?

And speaking of dogged determination, that’s definitely one way to describe marathoner Devon Bieling. After falling to the ground exhausted just metres from the finish line, she tried to crawl to the finish but was hampered by the sharp gravel…so she rolled over the line instead. Not only that, but she still managed to finish within the cut off for her BQ. Now that’s one incredible finish (but I really hope I don’t have to resort to that on Sunday!).

I couldn’t let this week go by without mentioning cyclist Mark Beaumont. Not only has he just set an incredible new world record with his around the world cycle, but he’s from my part of the world. What an adventure!

And finally, we all know running can do funny things to your insides and have probably all had to take an unintended pit stop during a run or cut a run short to answer the call of nature, but in Colorado Springs a most bizarre situation is unfolding as a runner nicknamed “The Mad Pooper” appears to be targeting some residences to leave her mark. How very odd!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 15th September

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

For the first time this year, I just didn’t manage to pull my Friday Finds post together while it was still actually Friday! I tried, but was just too tired after a busy couple of days to finalise my article choices and finish it off. So this week, let’s call it Saturday Stories – sorry!

As marathon day edges ever closer (one more week – eek!) my thoughts inevitably turn to the big day. The result? Some reading material with a marathon slant this week…

First, something rather disappointing. While I understand the strong desire to set a BQ (Boston Qualifying) time and secure a coveted place in the Boston marathon, I find it appalling the lengths some people will go to in order to claim that place, often depriving more genuine applicants of their chance. This week it came to light that thousands of runners have been accused of cheating at the Mexico City marathon, many of whom were recorded as having BQ times. I find it incredible that something like this could happen on a large scale, but am pleased that the vigilant Derek Murphy at Marathon Investigation is always looking out for such things. Here is his analysis of the results from that race:

Speaking of Boston, race director Dave McGillivray finally managed to stage an event that first entered his mind decades ago and which he has been planning for years – a marathon entirely inside a Major League Baseball stadium. Just 50 runners were accepted into the 100+ lap (!!!) USATF certified event at Fenway Park which took place as I was pulling this post together. The winner? The one and only Mike Wardian, of course!

This next article had me intrigued. It’s a report on a study of language learning and whether or not exercise could help. Findings suggest that working out can improve our ability to memorise, retain and understand new vocabulary, giving further weight to the theory that exercise boosts brain power as well as physical fitness. Perhaps I should switch to language-learning podcasts on my training runs. I could be much more adept with foreign languages after a cycle of marathon training!

For me, one of my favourite things about marathon training is the eating I can do. I LOVE my food so being able to put away huge meals without any difficulty is a real joy (I just have to remember to stop once the race is over and I’m not training so hard anymore!). Funnily enough, it’s not just me and I enjoyed this short piece from Women’s Running which beautifully sums up my feelings up with regard to food:

And finally, not a new video by any means, but I recently came across this again and with a marathon on the horizon, found it rather entertaining.

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 8th September

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Happy Friday! Hope you’re looking forward to an awesome weekend. Let’s get things sorted with a few bits and pieces to read…

First, something from a source I never expected to be including in a running blog… the Times Educational Supplement (TES), yet the core of the article sums up beautifully what my life is like. I often think there are many parallels between teaching and being a runner, but that’s usually the sort of talk that has my colleagues rolling their eyes at me and thinking, “there she goes again, banging on about running!” Yes, the article is ostensibly tips for navigating the school year, but the comparison of teaching to an ultra marathon is perfect. Check it out to see what I mean…

Fancy being part of a world record attempt? All it takes is a Strava account and a bit of time on Sunday as Strava partners with the Great North Run to attempt the world record for the most half marathons run in a day. Personally I have a little further to run that morning, but I’ll be adding my run to the attempt and keeping my fingers crossed that I become a world record holder!

At the other end of the distance spectrum we have London’s newest running track. What’s so special about a track, you ask? Well this 150m track is on the roof of an office block, 16 floors up. Sounds great in theory, but with 10 laps to complete to reach a mile and a whopping 281 to complete marathon distance, I think the novelty would soon wear off!

A novelty that NEVER wears off is cake, the weakness of many a runner. Nothing quite like a long run then a slice of cake to “refuel”. Aware of this habit, Runner’s World has selflessly put lots of different cakes to the test to see which ones might actually provide the tiniest of benefits to runners. What’s your favourite?

And finally, you know that episode of Friends where Joey wears all Chandler’s clothes? Well think of that, but a bit more sporty and you’re part way to getting this next video. Basically this guy in Canada decided to take on a decathlon whilst wearing 100 T-shirts (yes, you did read that right). It has to be seen to be believed!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 1st September

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Hello September! Where on earth did you suddenly appear from? I hope everyone has had a great week. Here are some articles I’ve come across this week for your reading pleasure…

First, a bit of research into the prevalence of knee arthritis in our modern world. We runners are constantly subjected to non-runners declaring running to be bad for our knees, but as this article points out, there really isn’t much in the way of research to support that. There is, however, plenty of research showing that osteoarthritis is becoming increasingly common. In a bid to shed some more light on why, researchers studied skeletons from a number of different periods and developed some theories as to why arthritis is more common now. I don’t want to spoil it for you, but based on their theories I would suggest that those of us who run are actually doing the best thing to take care of our knees.

Some further interesting research sought to settle the question of whether marathon training or iron distance triathlon training was harder. Sound like a pub debate? Well to an extent the researchers were trying to find answers to the very questions they explore with friends. I’ve never trained for an iron distance tri, but I have trained for marathons so know what that feels like. With that in mind, the results of that study turned out to be rather intriguing…

I also enjoyed this article from Trail Runner magazine about Strava. I know I’ve included plenty of articles about Strava before, but they have tended to be related to road running or Strava art. This considers the implications and etiquette for Strava on the trails in a bit more depth. That said, some of the etiquette definitely transfers to other activities e.g. coming up with a better name than the stock option for workouts (I don’t always do that terribly quickly, but do take some time at the weekends to change “Afternoon Run” to something a bit more catchy!).

Also discussing trails (albeit in a rather different context) is my next article taken from Motiv Running. By now you’re probably familiar with the concept of the beer mile, but what if that mile was taken to a whole new level by being run at altitude? Well apparently that is a real event that people take part in. Not only do you have the challenge of keeping 4 carbonated beers inside your stomach as you run laps, but the altitude works against you by making the beer even fizzier and your body less able to take in oxygen. Sounds like a pretty difficult challenge to me! Anyone tempted?

And finally, you have to check out this amazing shoe art. Yujia Hu, a Milan-based restaurant owner, is instagramming his amazing sushi in the form of various running shoes. Dubbed “shoeshi”, his creations are certainly attracting interest. Definitely too good to eat!

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 25th August

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

And just like that, Friday came around again! Here are some of the articles that caught my eye recently…

First, one of those amazing feats of endurance we hear about from time to time, and a double one at that. Ultra endurance athlete Mike Wardian first took on the Leadville 100 mile race, an incredibly tough ultra with over 4800m of climb at altitude, where he placed 10th. That in itself is impressive, but just a few hours later he was lining up at the start of the Pike Peaks marathon, another race at high altitude. With over 20 hours of racing in a 27 hour period, all I can say is wow!

So what makes the likes of Wardian capable of achieving such incredible things? One scientist believes it could be due to gut bacteria. His research has noted elevated levels of bacteria which break down lactic acid in ultra endurance athletes, leading to the longer term aim of creating a probiotic pill for non-elite athletes. An interesting premise, although I’m not entirely sure how I feel about it. What about you?

But we’re not all¬†quite¬†such elite performers as the likes of Wardian. For most of us, running can feel hard. There are good days and bad days, days when we float along gazelle-like and days when we trip up over our own feet. With this in mind, I enjoyed this article from Motiv Running which highlights why that’s ok and how running can help teach us a wider lesson about tenacity and resilience.

In a similar vein is this article from Popsugar which considers how yoga has helped the writer to become a better runner. Nothing unusual there I hear you say, but this is not an article about the benefits of greater flexibility, instead other benefits of yoga are considered. Given my increasing interest in yoga, this resonates with me.

And finally, kitten yoga. Yes, i know we’ve been here before, but I’m in the mood for a cat video and those kittens are just so darned cute. I HAVE to do a class like this some time (although I would more than likely adopt one of the kitties!).

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 18th August

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Phew! What a week! It was back to work for me and after a summer off my body has definitely forgotten how to deal with a week of teaching and I don’t feel quite as fresh as I did this time last week. As a result, I’ve a feeling this week’s Friday Finds will be a fairly quick one…

This time last week I was still engrossed in coverage of the World Athletics Championships. There were certainly plenty of memorable moments (for various reasons) and I found it enlightening to read about the moments the reporters covering the meet picked as their most memorable.

And on the subject of the World Champs, I thought I’d slip in one last find. Ever wondered what it’s like to run at the same pace as the likes of Mo Farah? A few lucky people recently got the chance to find out:

But now something rather more serious. Scrolling through my various feeds earlier today my attention was caught by the featured picture from an article. I saw a picture of a woman who looked strong as hell, focused and running well, striving for a goal. And then I saw what the article was about and was horrified. This picture, it seems, had been viewed very differently by one man and his comments on it brought into sharp focus the way in which women continue to be objectified and blamed for violent crimes perpetrated against them. The runner’s response, however, is measured in its examination of the underlying problem: the attitude embodied by those comments. If you haven’t already seen it then it’s definitely worth a read.

To stop me getting too worked up about the last find and getting on my soapbox on a Friday night, let’s look at something a bit more friendly. Last weekend The Observer published a running special with several articles on the subject for runners of varying levels of experience. I thought I’d share one in which a number of well-known people were interviewed about their running. You might very well find that a lot of them run for similar reasons to the rest of us.

And finally, I bet you’ve seen a few weird things when running, whether a training run or a race. I recently came across an abandoned wheelchair (I can only assume some kind of miracle had occurred) and have had interesting encounters with wildlife. I’ve also seen my fair share of crazy fancy dress outfits in races. Why not compare your own strange sightings to the weird things spotted by the runners in this article:

Happy reading,
The Running Princess

Friday Finds – 11th August

Friday Finds is a regular feature in which I collate and share interesting articles and posts on running/health/fitness which I’ve read recently. Some might be inspiring, some might be scientific, some might provoke debate. All are things I’ve found in some way thought-provoking.

Have you been watching the World Championships Athletics from London this week? I’ve been loving watching world class competition every evening and there have been some thrilling performances to watch – the men’s 10,000m, the women’s marathon and the legend that is Usain Bolt to name a few. There have also been some more “controversial” moments – continuing discussion of Caster Semenya, Makwala not being allowed to race due to illness and the reception of Justin Gatlin spring to mind. All of these have been covered extensively in my news feeds this week, but rather than go over old ground I thought I would bring you a few articles I had already saved…

I’m going to start with this piece by Running Like a Girl author Alexandra Heminsley. Considering the brilliant This Girl Can campaign from Sport England, Heminsley reflects on some of the barriers we create for ourselves which hold us back from participation. I have often heard people make comments like, “I’m not a real runner,” or say that they can’t take up a particular sport or go to a particular gym class until they lose weight/get fitter/become more flexible – some of the very things that activity would help with. Heminsley herself recognises that these moments mirror her own thinking before finding sport and once upon a time I felt the same. A great reminder that whether it’s running, swimming or something else entirely, nobody is born a fully-formed expert, but participation is all it takes to be able to call yourself part of the tribe.

This next article has raised some very interesting debate. Is it more impressive to run a super fast mile or to complete a marathon (or ultra)? It seems to me that every distance presents its own unique challenges, but that doesn’t necessarily make one better than another. In the mile, you’ve got a few minutes of lung-busting, heart-thumping effort (possibly ending with a bit of “pavement pizza” if you’ve really pushed it) whereas in the marathon and beyond there are the challenges of time on your feet, aching limbs, blisters and keeping your body fuelled. Different distance, different challenge. Is running a 4 minute mile impressive? Of course it is. What about completing a marathon? Apparently only 1% of the population will ever do so, so I’d say that’s another yes. What makes a challenge impressive is the possibility of failure rather than what that challenge actually is. For me, a sub-4 hour marathon is waaaaaay more likely (and appealing!) than a sub-4 minute mile. Both would present their own challenges. What are your thoughts?

If maintaining motivation is your issue, then perhaps this next article will help. A number of running bloggers were asked for their top tips to stay motivated. Most of the suggestions are probably fairly familiar, but it can still be useful to see it written down and read about another’s experiences. Perhaps you’ll find something in this extensive list useful. Do you have any to add?

Now to some cycling. Although I’ve been completing a bike workout every week in the gym for months now, it’s been some time since I’ve been on my trusty steed Trixie. I’m lucky enough to live somewhere with plenty of cycling options, but I know that for many this is not possible which can be off-putting, and am conscious that many cities on the continent are much better equipped for cyclists than we are here. But what would an ideal cycling city look like? That’s exactly what Steven Fleming considers in his new publication Velotopia. Would you want to live there?

And finally, I’ll leave you with this poem by Nat Runs Far published on Women’s Running. There is a certain poetry to getting into the groove of a long run on a sunny day, and this really captures that moment.

Happy reading,
The Running Princess